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GDC Integrates Best Turkey Address Partner into Worldview

This week we announce the integration of Turkey’s best address intelligence service into GDC’s Worldview platform. Our partner, an Istanbul business with over 10 years of experience working closely with the Turkish government, demonstrates the command of local nuance needed to be the country’s most reliable address resource. As I discovered on a recent trip, if ever there is a country where local details make a difference in getting the right address…it’s Turkey.

The Turkish Opportunity

Istanbul straddles the East and the West. Standing on a bridge watching ships traffic the waterways and listening to the call to prayer in the background brings into stark clarity – I have ventured into a brand new cultural world. While Turkish commerce maintains its traditions of merchants peddling wares in the Grand Bazaar, it has evolved to also include the most sophisticated forms of cross-border eCommerce.

The world’s great brands recognize that Turkey is an exciting market. eCommerce has grown over 500 percent since 2009, most of which has come from consumers buying goods that are shipped from out of country. And the youth are driving the economic boom. Less than 15 percent of the population is over 55, meaning a tech-savvy and brand-conscious generation is defining the country’s new buying habits.

But when it comes to addresses, businesses shipping product into Turkey are going to need a lot of local help.

My Address Confusion in Istanbul

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While in Istanbul I had a couple of key experiences that highlighted the difference and difficulties of address verification in a city in this region.

The first was getting to my hotel. My bus dropped me off in the city’s famous Taksim Square, a tightly-packed area with nearly 20 hotels all within a few blocks. I tried to use my phone to navigate to my hotel’s address, but the map could only get me to the center of the square. It could not find the location with any greater precision, so – in an effort to triangulate my way to the proper destination – I resorted to stopping into shops and asking clerks to point me in the right direction. Even though I had the proper address, the mapping technology was not able to provide the granular result I needed to find my hotel.

Then I had to get to our local partner’s office. Istanbul is massive with many districts and neighborhoods. I gave the taxi driver the office address, and he immediately honed in the district, then found the proper neighborhood and upon “arrival” he starting asking locals where to find the final destination. Why? Because the address I had was missing a crucial piece of information…a proper cross street. As I came to discover, in much of Turkey you need to provide cross street information both when getting directions and also to ensure prompt and accurate delivery.

These kind of details are often overlooked by global address verification systems that rely on generic, international standards for formatting and validation. As I’ve found over and over again in my long address intelligence career, you simply cannot know the nuances of a country unless you are working with partners that live there, speak the language, and provide address services to local businesses that rely on accuracy. That’s the power of local intelligence in making sure you get your addresses right.

Dinner on the Bosphorous River and Reflections on Local Intelligence

On my last night in Turkey the founder of our partner company squired me out of Istanbul, bringing me north along the Bosphorous River. We traveled until the road ended at a quaint fishing village, and we sat outside on a chilly evening, dining on some of the best seafood I’ve ever had in my life.

At dinner we spoke at length about his company and how they apply local knowledge to help businesses get Turkish addresses right. He talked in length about serving Turkish companies, taking their feedback, and constantly improving his address data and rules. We spoke about the growth opportunities that his clients were experiencing in Turkey and beyond. We discussed the expansive world of international commerce and yet how so much of success depends on getting things right on a local level.

As I peered out into the night, I saw the flashing red lights of a freighter cruising up the river. My colleague pointed out that around the bend, and some miles away, the Bosphorous empties into the Black Sea. I couldn’t help but reflect on how close we were to Crimea and Ukraine, countries that had always seemed to me to be so different from Turkey, but are so close and so connected.

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